Saturday, November 26, 2011

YA Indie Carnival - Recipe for Plotting

This week's YA Indie Carnival topic is Recipes for Plotting Stories. To this I say…nothing I do is customary.  I learned early on that there was an expectation for me to write a book following the 'perfection' of traditional formulas.  Instead, I created a series unlike any before it. It’s one that could only be written and published by an indie author.
My recipe is simple:
·         1 Distinct Idea
o   A physician with the ability to heal the dying 
·         1 Story Filled With Enough Realism To Make the Paranormal Believable
o   The real-life hospital emergencies act as the perfect balance to the main character’s miraculous abilities.
·         3 Great Main Characters (and lots of great supporting characters)
o   Allison La Crosse (beautiful resident)
o   Brody Kennedy (gorgeous chief resident)
o   Clark Ardent (amazing friend, land lord, and attorney)
·         More Than a Dash of Romance…Drama…Action
o   Allison & Brody  OR  Allison and Clark
o   Suri Chan’s (who has a stalker-like crush on Brody)
o   Good vs. Evil
·         18 Chapters (432 pages) To Tell The Story
Chapter 1   – A Bridge to the Other Side
Chapter 2   – Satan’s Sect
Chapter 3   – The Catalyst
Chapter 4   – Roses are Red
Chapter 5   – The Salvadare
Chapter 6   – Observation
Chapter 7   – Good Luck Charms
Chapter 8   – Stranger Anxiety
Chapter 9   – Betrayed
Chapter 10 – It Is What It Is
Chapter 11 – Breaking and Entering
Chapter 12 – Lighthearted
Chapter 13 – God Grant Me the Serenity
Chapter 14 – Deadly Sins
Chapter 15 – Warriors
Chapter 16 – Disciples
Chapter 17 – Violated
Chapter 18 – Miracles Do Happen

After combining the above ingredient, you will read and re-read.  With each pass, you will build on every detail, fine-tune each aspect of the story, and edit, edit, edit.  When you think that you are completely finished and the book is perfect, put it aside for a few weeks.  Then, got back and read, build, fine-tune, and edit for as many times as it takes for you to feel comfortable.  After you’ve vetted the story and its editing through someone who is completely objective, and they’ve given you the thumbs up, you can publish your book.

8 comments:

  1. Fantastic recipe! I like the fact that once it's done, you set it aside for a few weeks and then come back to it. Working with photos, I do the same thing. Sometimes when you work so closely and so long on a project you fail to see some of the areas that still need work... so it's important to get a fresh perspective. Thanks so much for sharing your process! :)

    ReplyDelete
  2. As always, thanks, Dani, for your support.

    ReplyDelete
  3. I love your bravery--trad publishing is so stringent and has no idea what it's missing!

    ReplyDelete
  4. T,
    LOVE this post. Very fun & original. I agree with Dani, my favorite part is when the story has to "steep" for a while. And, of course, I love more than a dash of romance!

    ReplyDelete
  5. Patti, I've accomplished goals as an indie author that would never have happened if I'd pursed traditional publishing. I'll forever be grateful for the the lessons I've learned. Who knows where all this will lead...

    Laura, Thanks so much for your feedback and your visit.

    ReplyDelete
  6. Awesome recipe! Those endless edits are tough though, right? Whew! :)

    ReplyDelete
  7. Amy, as hard as it is for me to depend on others, I realized editing is best left to someone who doesn't 'think' they know how each sentence reads.

    ReplyDelete
  8. So true... maybe I'll get brave enough eventually.

    ReplyDelete